BREAKING NEWS: The Metropolitan Police Will Destroy Around 300 Illegal Dogs, Seized By Its Status Dog Unit This Year.

#WeGotYourBack #WeGotItCovered #BreakingNews #SkyNews #DangerousDogs #ToBePutDown #PitBullTerriers #JapaneseTosa #DogoArgentino #Fila Brasileiro #MetropolitanPolice #SDU

Most of the animals that have to be put down are pit bull terriers which cannot be returned to their owners as they are unsafe.

The SDU is a team of officers that deal exclusively with dangerous dogs.The SDU’s Inspector Patrick O’Hara said: “They are not necessarily all healthy dogs or safe dogs to have around people. Far from it in fact.

“What I can say is we have re-homed around 56 dogs this year and we won’t destroy a dog without some kind of a paper trail like a disclaimer, when the dogs can’t be lawfully rehomed or a court order that says it must be destroyed.

“But if a court rules that a dog is not a danger to the public and the owner is a fit and proper person then nine times out of 10 that dog goes home.”

Four breeds were banned under the Dangerous Dogs Act in 1991 following a spate of horrific attacks – the pit bull terrier, Japanese tosa, dogo Argentino and fila Brasileiro.

The controversial piece of legislation was designed to make the ownership and breeding of the four types of dog illegal.

It was hoped the breeds would die out naturally. But that has not happened.

According to an undercover investigation by The Dogs Trust charity, many are smuggled in from Eastern Europe by breeders using fake pet passports.

Inspector O’Hara told Sky News they have seen a 7% increase in seizures.

He also said his figures show the four breeds most likely to be involved in attacks are bull types including pit bull cross breeds.

These are the dogs with the strongest links to criminality, he added.

It is one reason why the Status Dogs Unit also works closely with Trident, the Met’s specialist team that deals with gang violence in London.

Pit bull terriers are popular with gangs because the penalty for illegal dog ownership is far less severe than getting caught with a gun or a knife.

cegrab-20160412-011942-0-1-736x414

That is why these dogs are also known as weapon or status dogs.

Animal campaigners want to see a change in the law.

Groups like DDA Watch say breed-specific legislation was a knee-jerk reaction to the problem.

“Killing healthy animals that have done nothing wrong is inhumane,” a spokesperson said.

“Dogs should be treated on a case-by-case basis and not have its fate sealed at birth because of its breed.”

Inspector O’Hara disagrees.

“It’s difficult to measure the effectiveness of the legislation because you can never know the preventative effect that it has had,” he said.

“But I think by and large it is fit for purpose and it could be enhanced with a few small tweaks.”

Source: http://news.sky.com/story/1676759/met-to-destroy-hundreds-of-dogs-as-attacks-rise

For more breaking news visit:

MICSTAGESUK

On-line magazine/ website  bringing you the hottest headlines, as they drop.  We cover: Politics, Current Affairs, Movies, Music, Events, Reviews, Health, Sports and Fashion

Like, comment and follow us on:

Facebook: Micstages UK  Twitter: @MicstagesUK  Gmail: MicstagesUK

 ***WE GOT YOUR BACK***

BREAKING NEWS: From April 6, All Dogs In England Aged Eight Weeks And Over Must Be Microchipped.

#WeGotYourBack #WeGotItCovered #BreakingNews #ITVNews #HealthNews #UK #Pets #DogMicrochipping #Compulsory

Why is microchipping a legal requirement?

Lost and stray dogs cost the taxpayer and charities £33 million a year so a microchip makes it much easier to reunite a dog with its owner.

However, your dog will still need to wear a collar and tag that states the name and address of the owner when in a public place.

The new law means microchips can also connect owners to abused pets so they can be held criminally liable.

And it will crackdown on the dog black market which is worth tens of thousands of pounds every year.

How does it work?

A tiny microchip about the size of a grain of rice is implanted under the dog’s skin on the back of the neck in a painless procedure.

This gives the dog their own unique code which can be scanned and matched to your contact details if your dog becomes lost or stolen.

The details are then kept on a database, so make sure you register the chip if no one is submitting the necessary paperwork on your behalf.

It is always worth checking your chip has been registered correctly.

And if your contact details change, make sure the microchipping database know. This will incur a fee each time.

Dogs will still be required to wear collars and tags in public places.
Dogs will still be required to wear collars and tags in public places. Credit:

How do I get my dog chipped?

All dogs aged eight weeks and over must be microchipped by April 6.

This can be done quickly and easily by your vet and will usually cost between £20 and £30.

Alternatively, some charities such as Dogs Trust offer the service for free. Click to search free services in your area

Anyone breeding dogs will be responsible for microchipping puppies before they sell them or give them to new owners.

All imported dogs will also need a microchip.

Microchipping will make it much easier for owners to be reunited with lost pets.
Microchipping will make it much easier for owners to be reunited with lost pets. Credit: PA

What if I don’t get my dog microchipped by April 6?

If you don’t get your dog microchipped by April 6, you are breaking the law.

To be considered microchipped, a chip must have been implanted in your dog and registered on an approved database.

If your dog is caught without a microchip you will have 21 days to get it chipped.

If you do not comply, you face a fine of up to £500 or a conviction.

Alternatively, a dog warden may seize your dog, microchip it and then recover the cost from you.

Dog owners who do not comply can be hit with a fine of up to £500 or a conviction.
Dog owners who do not comply can be hit with a fine of up to £500 or a conviction. Credit: PA

How often does my dog have to be microchipped?

Your dog only needs to be microchipped once as the chip will last its whole life.

But owners need to make sure they keep their contact details up-to-date or the chip will be useless.

What if I sell my dog?

If you sell or pass on your pet, you as the owner are legally required to register the new keeper.

Similarly, if your dog dies, you must inform the database that holds your pet’s details.

Source: http://www.itv.com/news/2016-03-31/dog-microchipping-is-compulsory-from-next-week-here-is-what-you-need-to-know/

For more breaking news visit:

MICSTAGESUK

On-line magazine/ website  bringing you the hottest headlines, as they drop.  We cover: Politics, Current Affairs, Movies, Music, Events, Reviews, Health, Sports and Fashion

Like, comment and follow us on:

Facebook: Micstages UK  Twitter: @MicstagesUK  Gmail: MicstagesUK

 ***WE GOT YOUR BACK***

 

Dog Owners Warned: “4 Dogs In The UK Effected By Deadly Tick-Born Disease Canine Babesiosis”.

#WeGotYourBack #WeGotItCovered #BreakingNews #SkyNews #UK #HealthNews #Dogs #DeadlyTickDisease

One dog is reported to have died and several others are seriously ill after contracting Canine Babesiosis.

tick

Dog owners have been warned to check their pets for the parasite

Dog owners are being warned about a deadly tick-borne disease that has been found in the UK for the first time.

Government health agencies are investigating how the condition canine babesiosis affected four dogs that have never travelled outside England.

One dog is reported to have died of the disease, and the others have been taken seriously ill.

The outbreak has been traced to an area of Harlow in Essex, but it is feared the disease could spread elsewhere, despite measures to contain it.

Babesiosis attacks the blood cells of dogs. The symptoms include fever, lethargy, pale gums and general weakness, and if left untreated it can be fatal.

Vets have needed to perform emergency blood transfusions to combat the disease.

Harlow Council said: “It is important that dog owners have their pets protected with anti-tick treatment and regularly check their dogs for ticks. Further advice is available from local vets.”

Councillor Mark Wilkinson said the area was popular with dog walkers, and added that the the alert was “purely precautionary”.

“Further tests are going to be carried out on the land once the weather improves, and if necessary further advice will be issued,” he said.

“The council is also in contact with the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and is seeking any further advice from them.”

The website PetMD.com advises owners to do a thorough body check of their dog to find ticks, which are visible to the naked eye but can be drawn to dark, hidden areas of the animal’s body such as ears, groin and between the toes.

Signs of ticks include dogs excessively scratching or licking a particular area.

To remove a tick, owners are advised to use tweezers to grip the tick by the head and pull it straight out, and not to twist, burn or apply anything to the skin.

The tick can be killed once it has been removed by putting it in a small amount of alcohol, rather than squashing it.

There are concerns the tick could also be carried by wild animals.

Source: http://news.sky.com/story/1660752/dogs-in-uk-at-risk-from-deadly-tick-disease

 

For more health news : Like, comment and follow:

MICSTAGESUK

On-line magazine/ website  bringing you the hottest headlines, as they drop.  We cover: Politics, Current Affairs, Movies, Music, Events, Reviews, Health, Sports and Fashion

Facebook: Micstages UK  Twitter: @MicstagesUK  Gmail:MicstagesUK

 ***WE GOT YOUR BACK***